Items tagged "Video Marketplace"

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FCC Must Proceed: Don’t Let Congress Stop the Clock on Unlocking the Box

June 15, 2016 FCC , Legislation , Set-Top Boxes , Unlock the Box , Video Marketplace

As we speak, House and Senate Republicans on the Appropriations Committees are trying to attach a number of inappropriate legislative policy riders added on to important appropriations bills for 2017. One rider in particular takes direct aim at the Federal Communication Commission’s ongoing proceeding to “unlock the box.” That proceeding would unburden consumers of hundreds of dollars in annual rental fees for their cable boxes, open up the market for new choices as to how they access the content of their choosing, and lower barriers to entry for innovative technologists and for diverse and independent content creators.

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Cable Company Practices Indicate a Need for Increased Enforcement of Consumer Privacy Laws

June 8, 2016 Consumer Privacy , FCC , FTC , Privacy , Video Marketplace

In March of this year, the Center for Digital Democracy released a comprehensive report outlining the increasing use of subscriber data by Internet Service Providers and video providers. The report details the common practices of cable operators gathering their customers’ personal information, sharing and combining that information with third parties, and using it to target customers for advertising on an individual level.

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Zombies, Pirates, and Why the Latest Copyright Fray Over Set-Top Box Undermines Itself

April 13, 2016 Copyright , FCC , Set-Top Boxes , Unlock the Box , Video Marketplace

Did you hear the one about the new technology that was going to run amok, squashing creativity, gobbling up every copyrighted work in its path, and redistributing it for free to all of the masses until nothing remained but scorched earth and abandoned studios across Hollywood?

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FCC’s Video Device Rulemaking Is Excellent News For Consumers – But We’re Not Home Just Yet

February 23, 2016 FCC , Set-Top Boxes , STELAR , Unlock the Box , Video Marketplace

It’s no small secret that America loves a saga. And in the battle for real consumer video choice, we’re just getting started. Last week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) took a huge step towards loosening cable’s chokehold on consumers in the name of more choices and more innovation. It voted 3-2 in favor of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (an “NPRM,” to those in The Biz) for new digital cable box standards that would allow customers to access their programming subscriptions through devices other than those they currently lease directly from their cable company.

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As the FCC Unlocks the Box, Privacy Remains a Top Priority

February 11, 2016 FCC , Privacy , Set-Top Box , Unlock the Box , Video Marketplace

The Federal Communication Commission’s proposal to “unlock the box” and enable people to access pay TV content on any device could save customers billions, by giving them easier access to cable and online video on smart, innovative devices.

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Comcast’s Latest Zero-Rating Plan Threatens Video Choice

November 20, 2015 Competition , FCC , Future of Video , Video Marketplace , Zero Rating

Zero-rating raises some pretty complicated issues both globally and domestically. For example, Public Knowledge has observed that T-Mobile’s “Binge On” program, which doesn’t count some video providers towards data usage caps, raises some competitive implications that should be carefully considered. Other zero-rating programs are more clearly anticompetitive. Comcast’s continued exemption of its own data traffic from metering fits into that category. Public Knowledge has had a complaint pending at the FCC since 2012 regarding Comcast’s zero-rating; this recent expansion of such behavior further illustrates the harms zero-rating can cause in some circumstances.

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With Data Caps on the Rise, the FCC Must Consider Competitive Implications

November 9, 2015 Broadband Access , Data Caps , FCC , Future of Video , Video Marketplace

Many people have been “cutting the cord”–cancelling their cable TV subscriptions–and watching more video online. Usually, however, their broadband provider is the same company that used to be their TV provider. Cord-cutters tend to use broadband more than non-cord-cutters, so large cable companies that want cord-cutters to start paying them more again have hit on a solution: just charge more for broadband.

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New Paper by PK President Demonstrates Importance of Existing Antitrust and Economic Regulation

August 7, 2015 Antitrust , ComcastTWC , Net Neutrality , Video Competition , Video Marketplace

Thanks to recent antitrust enforcement and communications regulation, consumers continue to reap the benefits of exploding Internet entertainment, as well as educational and business opportunities. By facing down the proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner, and by establishing strong net neutrality rules, the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission have protected Internet users from discrimination and promoted broadband innovations that are critical to our democracy and essential to freedom of expression.

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SlingTV, Yahoo NFL Streaming, and What Online Video Means for Sports Fans

July 2, 2015 Future of Video , Online Video , OTT Content , Video Marketplace

For many Americans, live sports are the last piece of television content that is appointment viewing. And for many Americans, the only thing of value on television is the NFL. The fact that fans want to watch sports live, along with the sheer number of viewers of NFL games, makes live streaming of sports content vital to the future of online video.

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Down Periscope: Further Thoughts on Periscope, Meerkat, and the DMCA

May 22, 2015 Copyright , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Notice and Takedown , Video Marketplace

Shortly after the recent Floyd Mayweather/Manny Pacquiao boxing match, Re/Code published an op-ed that I wrote discussing some of the copyright implications of live video apps like Periscope and Meerkat. In that article I made two points: first, that we should hit pause on a collective panic over Periscope and Meerkat signaling the latest assault on copyrighted video, in part because rightsholders can bring the powerful DMCA notice-and-takedown provisions to bear on the problem, and in part because video streaming live events does not necessarily implicate copyright law.

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